Blog Archive

Licensing Gotcha #1 – OWA

Microsoft Licensing ClarityIf you’ve dealt with Microsoft Licensing, you’ll know there are lots of exceptions, gotchas, myths and riddles.  We want to clear some of those up in our blog posts so number one is a good place to start.  These all assume basic Microsoft licensing knowledge but if you need to top this up with some free training, look at our licensing courses or contact us.

Microsoft Exchange Server is licensed in a server and CAL (client access licence) model.  The CALs can be per-user or per-device.  These CALs provide the user or device rights to access the Exchange server but you need a client to read and send email, deal with calendar entries and so on.  The obvious client is Outlook; part of the Office family of applications.  In the past the Exchange CAL included an Outlook licence but this was no longer included after Exchange Server 2003 and since then, Outlook needs to be purchased separately.

Perhaps you don’t have Outlook?  That’s ok because the Exchange CAL provides the rights to access e-mail, calendar, contacts and tasks through either Outlook Web App (OWA) or through a mobile device via Exchange ActiveSync.

Typically a user will access their mailbox from a number of devices.  This is fine if you have deployed Exchange per-user CALs; the user can log into OWA from pretty much any internet connected device (hotel kiosks, airport lounge machines, home, work, internet cafés, etc.) and the user can synchronise to any supported mobile device.

If you have deployed per-device CALs then the user can only use OWA from licensed devices and can only synchronise from licensed mobile devices.

Hopefully you see the gotcha here.  Exchange is brilliant at providing access anywhere, anytime and on any device but only if you licence per-user.  For organisations that have per-device Exchange licensing, anywhere access becomes extremely restricted.


Easiest way to MCSA?

Perhaps you’re looking for a new job and you want to refresh your certification.  Perhaps you’re hiring new staff and want to skill them up quickly or meet targets to earn a Microsoft Partner Competency.  What’s the easiest way to earn a Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate (MCSA) accreditation?

Easy is the wrong word here.  None of these exams are easy; they exist to test and prove your experience and knowledge in a topic.  MCSA is also the prerequisite to earn the Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert accreditations which really are the pinnacle of Microsoft certifications.

However the fastest route to earn an MCSA, assuming you’re not upgrading an earlier qualification,  is to work towards either Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 MCSA or towards the Office 365 MCSA.  Each of these routes only require you to take two exams from scratch.

Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate Map

 

Your choice should clearly depend on your IT career path and the skills you’re going to need.  If you are open to all areas though, of those three MCSA options, we’d advise the Office 365 MCSA.  Firstly there is only one 5-day course whereas Windows MCSA involves two 5-day courses and thus more time out of the office and more cost.  Attending a course is not required to take an exam but it’s a great way to maximise your chances.  Secondly, the Office 365 MCSA can be used as the foundation to gain the MCSE qualification in Desktop Infrastructure, Server Infrastructure, Private Cloud, Messaging, Communications or SharePoint.  The Windows MCSA does not have an MCSE route.

Of course, we’d love to help you gain nay Microsoft qualification so please get in touch and see how we can help.