Licensing Gotcha #1 – OWA

Microsoft Licensing ClarityIf you’ve dealt with Microsoft Licensing, you’ll know there are lots of exceptions, gotchas, myths and riddles.  We want to clear some of those up in our blog posts so number one is a good place to start.  These all assume basic Microsoft licensing knowledge but if you need to top this up with some free training, look at our licensing courses or contact us.

Microsoft Exchange Server is licensed in a server and CAL (client access licence) model.  The CALs can be per-user or per-device.  These CALs provide the user or device rights to access the Exchange server but you need a client to read and send email, deal with calendar entries and so on.  The obvious client is Outlook; part of the Office family of applications.  In the past the Exchange CAL included an Outlook licence but this was no longer included after Exchange Server 2003 and since then, Outlook needs to be purchased separately.

Perhaps you don’t have Outlook?  That’s ok because the Exchange CAL provides the rights to access e-mail, calendar, contacts and tasks through either Outlook Web App (OWA) or through a mobile device via Exchange ActiveSync.

Typically a user will access their mailbox from a number of devices.  This is fine if you have deployed Exchange per-user CALs; the user can log into OWA from pretty much any internet connected device (hotel kiosks, airport lounge machines, home, work, internet cafés, etc.) and the user can synchronise to any supported mobile device.

If you have deployed per-device CALs then the user can only use OWA from licensed devices and can only synchronise from licensed mobile devices.

Hopefully you see the gotcha here.  Exchange is brilliant at providing access anywhere, anytime and on any device but only if you licence per-user.  For organisations that have per-device Exchange licensing, anywhere access becomes extremely restricted.