SQL Server 2014 Licensing Changes

When we talk to customers and partners about licensing, it’s lovely to see the light come on in people’s eye when they see that Microsoft licensing is not really that tricky.  Then we move onto SQL Server which always proves the exception to the rule.  To be fair SQL Server 2012 did simplify things somewhat and we’re glad to say now SQL Server 2014 has been released (1st April) the licensing stays unchanged for the most part.

Just two subtle changes.

One for high availability scenarios and the other for multiplexing with SQL Server Business Intelligence edition.

Passive Fail-Over

The rights to install and run a passive fail-over SQL Server have now moved to be a Software Assurance Benefit.  over servers terms will move to the Software Assurance (SA) Benefits section of the PUR and thus only applies to SQL Server licences covered with SA.

Before you grumble about reduced rights, let’s examine why Microsoft did this.  The passive server is considered ‘warm’ in that there’s no work offloaded from the primary server; it’s not clustered or load-balancing.  During a fail-over event the passive server becomes active and the licence is re-assigned.  If you don’t have Software Assurance (SA) on the SQL Server licence, the licence has to remain assigned to the newly active server for a period of at least 90 days.  This is a bit of an issue for customers; having the SQL workload remaining on the secondary server for so long before they could fail back to the primary active server.  Now the right to fail-over is granted through SA, customers can combine this with another SA benefit, Licence Mobility within a Server Farm, which allows customers to reassign licences between servers at will.  So moving the fail-over right to become an SA benefit just neatens up the flexibility to manage high availability SQL environments for both planned and unplanned downtime.

Batch Processing with Business Intelligence Edition

The second licensing update is just for SQL Server 2014 Business Intelligence Edition.  Microsoft are relaxing the multiplexing policy so it no longer requires a CAL for users or devices that access the BI server via a batch process.  It’s a common question: if you have a middle-tier application being accessed by lots of users and the middle-tier application is connecting to SQL for reporting for example, do all the users and devices need CALs? Typically, yes they did.  This is called multiplexing.

It caught many customers out so this licensing change goes some way to addressing the issue by enabling batch processing of data into SQL Server 2014 Business Intelligence edition without requiring CALs for the data sources supplying the data.  Batch Processing for this purpose is defined as an activity that allows a group of tasks occurring at different times to be processed all at the same time.

This only applies to SQL BI Edition.  All access to SQL 2014 Standard edition in the Server + CAL (Client Access Licence) model remain with all server access requiring a CAL.

SQL Server 2014 BI Multiplexing

Are there any other licensing changes in SQL Server 2014?

No.  There’s no impact to the Disaster Recovery SA benefit, which applies broadly across Server products that are covered with active SA.  Customers will still retain the benefit of installing and making available a cold SQL Server in a disaster recovery location.

The warm backup is the one we’ve described; active-passive.

And for active-active clusters there are no changes; full licensing applies to all server nodes in this type of configuration just like it has in the past.