Blog Archive

PowerPoint Presenter View Says No

PowerPoint Presenter ViewAn attendee had an issue with a PowerPoint file and could not choose ‘Use Presenter View’ as it was greyed out and disabled.  What’s more, when the slideshow was started, it didn’t take up the whole screen but annoyingly, played in a window and left the system tray icons at the bottom of the display.  How is a speaker supposed to present their awesome slideshow on plans for World Domination v1.0 if they can’t even get PowerPoint working?  As you can imagine, we use PowerPoint quite a lot so were happy to point out the issue.

First thing to check of course is whether the dual monitor option in Windows is set up correctly and in this case it was.  The second cause is a feature of PowerPoint that is less well-known because most slideshows are presented live by a speaker.  An alternative is to set-up self-running presentations, either in full screen (for example on kiosk displays) or in a window.  These will typically use recorded timings for each slide and animations so they play and advance in a timely manner and might even loop continuously.  To set your PowerPoint deck up to run automatically, choose Set Up Slide Show in the Slide Show ribbon tab.

Set up slideshow button

 

 

This will open a window where you can set your play options.

Set up PowerPoint slideshow

 

 

 

 

 

In our attendee’s example, the Show Type was set to Browsed by an individual which meant the show would play in a resizable window and not full screen or presenter view.  Kiosk mode plays the show full screen and uses timings to advance the slides; users cannot click or touch to advance.  The default is Presented by a speaker and for some reason this deck had that option changed.  Once we’d selected the correct show type, the Use Presenter View checkbox was active again and the world is happy.

Of course, if you’d like to know more hints and tips on Microsoft PowerPoint or any Office application, we’d love to hear from you.

 


Activate Office 365 Partner Features

A question from David in Romford: How does a partner activate the Office 365 control panel for all their clients?

The partner features enable you to act as a delegated admin on behalf of your customer’s account; useful tasks such as adding new users, assigning licences, resetting passwords and raising support calls to Microsoft.  The partner features also allow you to create and send purchase offers and trial invitations for Office 365 plans and packages.

The process of activating the partner features is simple enough to set up but varies depending on whether you have an online account (Intune or Office 365) already or not.

I explain the process in Webinar 2 of the Building an Office 365 Practice series we ran in conjunction with Ingram Micro (partner features are explained at 40’44 into the video).  You can also view a (slightly outdated) presentation from Microsoft which includes a bit more detail and extra screenshots.

 

Activate Office 365 Partner Features

I Survived Windows XP End of Life!

The world hasn’t ended; cats and dogs still hate each other; there’ll be another series of the X-Factor (the apocalypse has its upside).  You are thinking the Windows XP end of life was a bit of a Y2K scare.  Perhaps it was and we can only hope.

But April 8th wasn’t the date you had to be worried about.  May 13th is.

Patch Tuesday is the day every month that Microsoft releases patches for their software.  Patch Tuesday is always the second Tuesday of each month.  April 8th 2014 was a Patch Tuesday and May 13th is the next one.  So on May 13th, Microsoft are likely to release security updates to their supported operating systems which describe and overcome vulnerabilities.  Those lovely little script kiddies around the world will read the updates and assume the vulnerabilities might also apply to unsupported operating systems such as Windows XP.  They will then attempt to exploit these because they know they will not be fixed.

Think about the recent Heartbleed vulnerability in OpenSSL.  As soon as this was made public, untold numbers of malware writers rushed to take advantage of it before the affected servers were patched.  Now imagine if those web servers were never patched.  Welcome to the fun world of unsupported software.

The Microsoft Security Intelligence Report analyses threats, vulnerabilities and malware using data from Internet services and over 600 million computers worldwide.  Volume 15 of the report included some intriguing graphs.  Many people argue that Windows XP is more vulnerable because it has been around longer and is attacked to a greater extent.  However, the diagram below (click to enlarge) shows the operating systems are attacked at a fairly even rate (right) and worryingly Windows XP is far more susceptible to attacks (left).  This may be because anti-virus wasn’t included in the OS (until Windows Defender in Windows 7) or because people might be more lacklustre in patching old machines.

Infection rates across Microsoft OSs

 

The graph below provides a historic take on why you should be concerned.  The blue line shows the level of infections rose dramatically when Windows XP service pack 2 (SP2) went end of life and we can only assume the same behaviour will occur for Windows XP SP3 (the final service pack).

Graph showing Malware attacks on Windows XP SP2

 

 

 

 

 

You can check the support lifecycle of all Microsoft software through their Support Lifecycle Search.


Do Office 365 Keys Expire?

Person recording a podcastA question from Daniel: “I am sure that one of you mentioned that it’s possible to purchase Office 365 keys in advance under Open and FPP and have up to 5 years to activate them.  Could you please confirm that as we have a client who is interested in buying 3 year term instead of 12 month subscription.”

This is a very common question and there are two terms to remember here.

 

1 – You have five years to redeem (activate) an Office 365 key after the purchase date

2 – You cannot have more than 2 years’ Office 365 service at a time

So if a customer with 100 users has an amount of cash they wish to use in a financial period and they’d like to buy Office 365 plan E3 in advance for several years they can purchase 5 x Office 365 E3 100 user keys.  Office 365 uses dynamic keys, for example if a customer has 25 users, they will receive one 25-digit activation key which will enable all 25 users licences when that key is redeemed.  This also applies to a customer with 100 users: 1 activation key.  So for our example you don’t want to buy 500 E3 licences as that will result in one activation key for 500 users.  Instead, purchase 5 lots of E3 SKUs for 100 users.  That will result in 5 activation keys.  Use the first key in year 1, then when your office 365 service is coming up for renewal pop up to the Microsoft Volume Licensing Service Centre (VLSC) and get the next key for year 2 and so on.

There are risks to this.  Many cloud services have gone down in price so the customer may be losing out by buying future years in advance.  And if they need to downsize to less than 100 users, they can’t change those keys.

Lastly, let’s examine the evidence here as I like to include my sources where possible.

The “Office 365 Open & FPP Business Policy and Service Activation Partner Guide” dated December 2013 lays out some Product Key Subscription Management Policies including:

  • Product Key Subscriptions cannot have more than two (2) years of service time outstanding.
  • To renew a Product Key Subscription, the Product Key required must include a greater than or equal to number of user licenses as is already assigned to the service.

The “Office 365 Open & Office 365 FPP FAQ” updated November 22nd, 2013 states “Product keys must be redeemed within 5 years from the time that they are purchased from Microsoft.”