Blog Archive

PowerPoint’s Morph Transition

When we train on PowerPoint, we don’t often go through the animations and transitions in detail because everyone plays with them and you should never overuse them.  There is a thin line between effective and gaudy.  Please, we’re begging you never to use the airplane transition in a serious presentation.

There are two very useful transitions in PowerPoint however; morph and whilst not listed on the transition ribbon group, the zoom control which we’ll blog about later this week.

Morph

Morphing two similar slides is nothing new and in the past I would have used animations tools such as motion paths and fade.  The morph transition potentially saves me hours by automating what I need.

Let’s get started

I have the following slide and want to add a second slide afterwards with different text and layout but essentially the same main components.

PowerPoint morph example slide 1

 

Of course, I could just use a fade transition but to be really flashy I’d create motion paths to move each of the elements around as if it were the same slide animating.

The easiest way to utilise morph is to duplicate your starting slide so now we have two slides the same.

In slide 2, move the elements where you want them to be, edit the text as required and create any new elements you require as you would normally.  Here’s my new slide 2.

PowerPoint morph example slide 2

 

Once you’ve finished, select the morph transition for slide 2 and if you have transition preview set on, you’ll see PowerPoint recognising the existing elements from slide 1 and automatically moving them to their new positions on slide 2.  The text and new elements simply fade in.

Here’s the effect.

 

Morph can also be set to animate words or characters as well as objects by setting your choice in Effect Options in the Transitions ribbon tab.

If you try to set morph on two completely dissimilar slides, you’ll just see morph perform a simple fade.

Whilst morph is a great time saver and looks really special, you may still need to create motion paths if you want elements to animate in certain ways, such as following a defined route.

This Early Solar System Explorations – Morph PowerPoint deck is a great example of using morph.  There are no animations in this deck whatsoever, the work is all done by PowerPoint and it makes the fictional Mrs Roberts look awesome.

Morph is available in PowerPoint on Office 365 and PowerPoint 2019.


PowerPoint Presenter View Says No

PowerPoint Presenter ViewAn attendee had an issue with a PowerPoint file and could not choose ‘Use Presenter View’ as it was greyed out and disabled.  What’s more, when the slideshow was started, it didn’t take up the whole screen but annoyingly, played in a window and left the system tray icons at the bottom of the display.  How is a speaker supposed to present their awesome slideshow on plans for World Domination v1.0 if they can’t even get PowerPoint working?  As you can imagine, we use PowerPoint quite a lot so were happy to point out the issue.

First thing to check of course is whether the dual monitor option in Windows is set up correctly and in this case it was.  The second cause is a feature of PowerPoint that is less well-known because most slideshows are presented live by a speaker.  An alternative is to set-up self-running presentations, either in full screen (for example on kiosk displays) or in a window.  These will typically use recorded timings for each slide and animations so they play and advance in a timely manner and might even loop continuously.  To set your PowerPoint deck up to run automatically, choose Set Up Slide Show in the Slide Show ribbon tab.

Set up slideshow button

 

 

This will open a window where you can set your play options.

Set up PowerPoint slideshow

 

 

 

 

 

In our attendee’s example, the Show Type was set to Browsed by an individual which meant the show would play in a resizable window and not full screen or presenter view.  Kiosk mode plays the show full screen and uses timings to advance the slides; users cannot click or touch to advance.  The default is Presented by a speaker and for some reason this deck had that option changed.  Once we’d selected the correct show type, the Use Presenter View checkbox was active again and the world is happy.

Of course, if you’d like to know more hints and tips on Microsoft PowerPoint or any Office application, we’d love to hear from you.